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Tutorials

 

FREE DOWNLOAD:
Tutorials, Techniques & Supply Sources

Many of my patterns contained supplies that are no longer available on my site, this download will help you source your supplies as well as teach you how to make your own craft snow & faux rusty tin from canvas fabric. If you are just looking for the Craft Snow Turorial & do not need the print verson, you can find that below...CLICK HERE to download the pdf.

 

CRAFT SNOW TUTORIAL

In the past, I carried a line of craft snow that was used in many Sew Many Prims' patterns.  These snows have been discontinued, so this tutorial will show you how they are made & where to get the supplies. 
 

Gathering your supplies:
The links provided in this tutorial are from amazon.com, just click on the picture if you want more info on that item.  You will also be provided with other ideas on how to source your materials.

If the images are not appearing in this column, just click on the links instead.

BELLA Personal Blender


Magic Bullet Personal Blender
PERSONAL BLENDER (used to grind the snow):

You're looking for something like these blenders.  I have used both that are pictured on the left & they do an equally good job.  I've used other's that have burned out immediately, one was a Hamilton Beach personal blender. That didn't work for this purpose because the cup was very tall & the base was quite narrow, so steer clear from that one & others like it. 

When looking for your personal blender, make sure it includes the following items:
  • (1) tall cup
  • (1) short cup
  • (1) 2-blade cap
  • (1) 4-blade cap
Keep in mind, you do not need to purchase an expensive blender for this task.  You can certainly use something you've picked up at a thrift store or yard sale. 

NOTE:  Once you start using your personal blender for craft snow, set it aside for craft purposes only.  Do not use it to blend food anymore.
Winter Snow

NOTE:  The product linked above on amazon.com says it's plastic snow in the title.  I purchased a bag to make sure it's syrofoam & it is.  It's apparantly a typo on their site.  

STYROFOAM (base for all snow):

Make sure it's 100% styrofoam, not plastic. I tried a combo styrofoam/plastic snow as my base & it came out looking pretty ugly & wouldn't grind down.  It needs to be styrofoam for this to work.
Here are some additional ideas for sourcing your styrofoam:
  • white styrofoam Cubes, Balls, Sheets that you can find in craft stores
  • white packing peanuts
  • old styrofoam coolers (nothing with print or logos...you want your styrofoam completely white)
  • white styrofoam shipping containers (used to protect tv's & Styrofoam (base for all snow)
Another option would be to check out your local floral or wedding supply stores.  Some carry a coarse sytrofoam shred around wintertime to use as snow in their floral design or wedding themes...you can normally purchase it pretty cheap & in bulk at these places.  Really though, almost any white styrofoam will do...just keep your eyes open & you'll have no problem finding your own source.
Mica Flakes
MICA (used in sparkly snow, sparkly spiced snow & mica powder)

There are many other options for Mica at amazon.com, but I purchased this item to make sure I'm recommending the exact same stuff I used - it is.  Feel free to experiment with other mica's though, I just can't guarantee your snow will turn out like what I previously sold here in my store.
Bulk Cinnamon
Bulk Cloves
SPICE MIXTURE (used in spiced snow & sparkly spiced snow)

This is just a mixture of Cinnamon & Cloves.  I currently have some for sale HERE.  It's made using 1 part cinnamon to 2 parts cloves.  If you make your own, feel free to experiment with the ratio...more cloves will give it a darker color (but ground cloves can be very expensive so you may want to ration them a bit wink), using more cinnamon will give it a rustier color.  Depends on your personal preference & the project you're working on.

If you plan on making large quantities of sparkly or plain spiced snow flurries, I recommend you buying these spices in bulk to save you some money (like what's pictured to the left). It could get very expensive if you're purchasing 2 oz shakers to make large batches of snow flurries.  On the other hand, if you don't plan on making much, then check out your local dollar stores, I'm sure they have at the very least cinnamon in stock, maybe both!

Making the Snow!!
 
MICA FLAKES:
Supplies List:
  • Mica Flakes
  • Personal Blender - optional
  • Tall blender cup (that came with your personal blender) - optional
  • 4-blade cap (that came with your personal blender) - optional
  • mask (always wear a mask when handling mica to avoid breathing in the fine dust particles)
Nothing to do here unless your mica flakes are quite large & you'd like to grind them down to get smaller flakes.  If that's the case, place the mica into the tall blender cup fitted with the 4-blade cap & pulse until the flake size is to your liking.
MICA POWDER:
Supplies List:
  • Mica Flakes
  • Personal Blender
  • Short blender cup (that came with your personal blender)
  • 2-blade cap (that came with your personal blender)
  • mask (always wear a mask when handling mica to avoid breathing in the fine dust particles)
Place the mica flakes in the short cup of your personal blender.  I would do a cup at a time, but you can do as much or little as you'd like.  Screw the 2-blade cap onto the cup.  Blend in short intervals until your mica has been ground down to a fine powder.  Now, this may take awhile so don't rush it.  I normally would pick up the blender (motor & all) while its running and slowly tip it to the left & right, back & forth to get the flakes flying all over the cup.  If you feel the motor heating up too much, just give it a break & start again after it has cooled down a bit. If you let it go too long you could overheat the motor.
EXTRA FINE SNOW FLURRIES
Supplies List:
  • Styrofoam (see suggestions under supplies)
  • Personal Blender
  • Tall blender cup (that came with your personal blender)
  • 4-blade cap (that came with your personal blender)
  • mask (the styrofoam particles don't really fly around as much as the mica's do,  but wearing a mask is still a good practice to follow).
1.  Preparation:  If you are using solid styrofoam like cubes, balls, blocks or anything of the sort you'll want to cut it up into manageable pieces....packing peanuts are a perfect size, so you won't need to do any prep work on them. 
2.  Grinding:  Place your styrofoam (whether it be cut up chunks, packing peanuts, shred or snow) into your tall blender cup fitted with the 4-blade cap.  Turn on & tip the blender (motor & all) back & forth, left & right to get the pieces moving.  This stuff gets staticy so you may need to turn it off & remove the cup & give it a good shake.  This process shouldn't take long at all (especially the peanuts, shred & snow).  If the cut up chunks are taking awhile to grind down, keep your eye on the heat produced by the motor.  If it's getting too hot, just give it a break & start again after it has cooled down a bit. If you let it go too long you could overheat the motor.
SPARKLY SNOW FLURRIES:
Supplies List:
  • 1 cup Extra Fine Snow Flurries (as made above)
  • 1/2 cup Mica
  • Personal Blender
  • Tall blender cup (that came with your personal blender)
  • 4-blade cap (that came with your personal blender)
  • mask (always wear a mask when handling mica to avoid breathing in the fine dust particles)
Place 1/cup Mica in the tall blender cup first, then add the 1 cup extra fine snow flurries & screw on the 4-blade cap.  (I put the mica in first because it's heavier & will help push the snow down towards the blade)  Turn on & tip the blender (motor & all) back & forth, left & right to get the pieces moving.  This stuff gets staticy so you may need to turn it off & remove the cup & give it a good shake.  Stop once the mica has been ground down to your liking & it has been incorporated well into the snow.  Always be mindful of the heat produced by the motor.  If it's getting too hot, just give it a break & start again after it has cooled down a bit. If you let it go too long you could overheat the motor.
SPICED SNOW FLURRIES:
Supplies List:
  • 1 cup Extra Fine Snow Flurries (as made above)
  • 1/4 cup spice mixture (see supplies list for more info)
  • Personal Blender
  • Tall blender cup (that came with your personal blender)
  • 2-blade cap (that came with your personal blender)
  • mask (the styrofoam particles don't really fly around as much as the mica's do,  but wearing a mask is still a good practice to follow).
Place 1/4 cup spice mixture in the tall blender cup first, then add the 1 cup extra fine snow flurries & screw on the 2-blade cap.  (I put the spices in the cup first to help push the lighter snow down into the blade)  Turn on & tip the blender (motor & all) back & forth, left & right to get the flurries moving.  The spices stick to the cup so it'll be hard to see what's going on.  I normally stop it to look inside.  If things aren't blended to my liking, I put the cap back on, give it a good shake & turn it back on. Stop once the spices have been well incorporated into the snow.  Always be mindful of the heat produced by the motor.  If it's getting too hot, just give it a break & start again after it has cooled down a bit. If you let it go too long you could overheat the motor.
SPARKLY SPICED SNOW FLURRIES:
Supplies List:
  • 1 cup Extra Fine Snow Flurries (as made above)
  • 1/2 cup Mica
  • 1/4 cup spice mixture  (see supplies list for more info)
  • Personal Blender
  • Tall blender cup (that came with your personal blender)
  • 2-blade cap (that came with your personal blender)
  • mask (always wear a mask when handling mica to avoid breathing in the fine dust particles)
Place 1/2 cup Mica in the talll blender cup first, the spice mixture second and the extra fine snow flurries last.  Screw on the 2-blade cap.  (I put the heavier items in the cup first to help push the lighter snow down into the blade)  Turn on & tip the blender (motor & all) back & forth, left & right to get the flurries moving.  The spices stick to the cup so it'll be hard to see what's going on.  I normally stop it to look inside.  If things aren't ground up to my liking, I put the cap back on, give it a good shake & turn it back on.  When the mica has been ground down to your liking & everything has been well incorporated, you are done.  Always be mindful of the heat produced by the motor.  If it's getting too hot, just give it a break & start again after it has cooled down a bit. If you let it go too long you could overheat the motor.